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Event Pics 2011


Fort Indiantown Gap, Annville, PA Jan 27 - 29



Corporal Moore takes a free few minutes to clean his rifle in the barracks. Truly a lesson we could all learn from.



Part of the training schedule for the weekend involved a refresher on the history and operation of the 2-inch mortar. Here we're joined by Bob Campbell of the North Stafordshire regiment. Moore and Campbell estimate range to target.




The team of Neri and Mateja are next on deck. To check accuracy Sgt. Petronis measures the distance to the intended target with a laser range finder. Yes, if they had them, they would've used them.




Friday night the members in attendance gathered for our traditional Polish dinner. Everyone brought something to share. This year our menu included golumbki, pierogi, kapusta, rye bread and makowiec. We washed it all down with some champagne, rather decadent considering there's a war on.



Soldiers from any time period enjoy letters and packages from home. Here the unit has just finished mail call. Petronis' wife informed him baby number 12 was on the way. Somehow I don't think they're going to make it on a sergeant's salary.


Operation Nordwind, Invitational Tactical
March 25, 26



For 2011 the Dragoons teamed up with our old friends from the
King's Own
and North Staffordshire Regiments.
Here we prepare to embark for the field with an 8 man rifle section.


Friday's scenarios saw us mostly on the offensive. Saturday however began with a purely defensive posture.
I basically put the cammo cloaking device on as a joke. Believe it or not, the German column actually
drove right past my 9 tons of armour without taking notice. At that point we opened fire from
our dug in positions.



New recruit Glen Lundee scans the fields for advancing Germans after working on his fighting position.


The fighting duo of Robert Cambell and Zach Mateja. The team took the extra initiative to use the pick and shovel from the half track to dig a very respectable dug out. When they were finished any infantryman would've been proud to call it home. I'm glad I didn't have to dig it.



Friends from the 15th Recce Regiment. Our two half tracks worked closely together all weekend coordinating the armoured assaults in support of the British-Commonwealth and Governments in Exile combined company.



Funny how once you start putting 40+ year old guys in back, the half track fills up pretty quickly.
Eight was about as cozy as we'd want to get.



Bob's expression leads me to believe he wasn't thrilled to be the guy every German would be shooting
at during our assault.

September 17-18 Eisenhower Farm Gettysburg, PA



It was nice to be back on the grounds of the NPS at Gettysburg. Our weekend weather varied with a little bit of rain, a little bit of warmth and a lot of mud. The field was quite soggy thanks to the heavy rainfall experienced earlier in the month.



The most popular vehicle of the weekend was the U.S. halftrack. The owner was kind enough to constantly be pulling people from the mire. The ruts serve as an example of how marshy the ground was.



This year we decided to cook our own meals. Corporal Moore did a great job of doing the cooking while the rest of the unit made water runs and cleaned up. Here everyone is expectantly waiting for some kielbasa. The corporal doesn't seem to be jumping out of his seat to heat it though.